Select Page

People have different reasons why they get succulents for their homes and offices. Some may use it to decorate their room and make it more pleasant; others take these plants indoors for their health benefits. You may also find out that hanging succulents are becoming more popular. This is an example of how people innovate when it comes to the usage and purpose s of succulents. You see, rare succulents can be found all over the world, but the best ones are those cared for and raised in a succulent lover’s home. 

As you already know, succulents are known for their ability to help you breathe better by purifying the air. They cleanse the air and remove the toxins therein. 

This benefit is usually undermined, but NASA itself released a study that highlights the succulent’s capacity to remove volatile organic compounds in the air by 87%. This means that the formaldehyde and benzene found in your ink, books, grocery bags, cigarette smoke, and rugs are absorbed from the air and taken out of the room. 

Aside from that, this plant also helps in preventing diseases. You see, over 10% of the atmosphere’s moisture comes from the water released by your plants. With this, you can say that the more plants you place inside your home, the better will its humidity be. As a result, you can prevent dry cough, sore throat, colds, and dry skin. In a study conducted by Norway’s Agricultural University, they found out that the sickness rates in offices filled with plants are lessened dramatically by 60%. 

These plants also help improve focus, as a study conducted by the researchers at the University of Michigan found out. According to the said research, a considerable number of respondent students showed a significant increase in their brain capabilities, attentiveness, and concentration when succulents and other plants were placed inside their room. 

With all the benefits succulents have given to you as its owner, it’s a good idea to repay them for taking care of you by giving them some tender loving care. And one of the best ways to show your concern to your dear succulent plants is by repotting them properly. You should start repotting your succulents the moment you get to buy them. 

In this article, we’ll walk you through the whole succulent repotting process to give you a better idea of how to properly do it. We’ll also give special emphasis on the reason why you need to repot them and also the different ways of doing so. So, to officially jumpstart your journey towards enjoying your succulents, read on. 

What Is Succulent Repotting

As the term suggests, succulent repotting is the process of carefully removing your succulent from its original pot and transferring them to a bigger pot filled with water-draining soil. This process is also advisable when you see your succulent outgrowing its old pot. Succulent lovers and repotting experts suggest using terracotta planters when repotting your plant since they help keep the extra moisture out of the soil. 

Benefits of Repotting Succulents

If it’s your first time dealing with succulents, you must be asking why it’s essential that they’re repotted. You may also be wondering when is the right time for them to be repotted. 

Generally, most succulents and cacti don’t need frequent repotting as they can thrive even in containers and pots that they have outgrown. Some of them look better when they spill out of their containers and pots. But this doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t repot them ever. Sooner or later, you’ll need to move them into their new home. 

When you just buy your succulents or cacti and it’s in a black plastic grow bag, you need to move them to a water-draining pot. It’s a good idea to do so to give your plant a more suitable container and potting mix. Take this time to closely inspect your plant for pests and rotting roots. 

Getting your succulent a more appropriate potting mix is another reason why you need to repot them. The said potting mix should be able to provide your plant with fresh and clean potting soil. This practice doesn’t only apply to newly-bought plants. You need to periodically replace the old potting mix when fresh soil gives your succulents the necessary nutrients to grow. 

You also need to repot when it’s necessary to accommodate bigger succulent plants. Soon, your succulents will outgrow their pots and could become top-heavy. You might also find them spilling out of its container. When this happens, you know that it’s time to give them a bigger room to grow. And the answer to that is repotting. 

Benefits of Repotting Succulents

Succulents grow bigger when you repot them in large containers. If you keep them in compact and tight containers, they can adapt to their environmental condition by growing slower. Repot them in bigger containers and give them ample space to grow. By doing so, you’re encouraging them to thrive and grow larger fast. With this in mind, repot and give your succulents a fresh start the moment you find about their stunted growth. 

Now that we’ve established the necessity of repotting let’s move on to discussing its benefits. As you already know, different reasons call for repotting. However, regardless of these reasons, one thing holds — repotting will always be beneficial to succulents. Here’s why. 

Helps Them Grow Healthier

First and foremost, repotting helps improve the plant’s general health. When you transfer them into a new potting medium, you provide them with more nutrients to help them grow healthier. Especially if you prepare the right potting mix and put them in a pot that has efficient features such as water-draining and air-circulation. Experts suggest terracotta planters as they’re good at dealing with plant moisture. 

Secondly, repotting also improves the plant’s general health as they give more nutrition to help succulents grow healthier. As mentioned above, even if you don’t repot your succulents, they end up adapting to the size of the old pot they’ve overgrown. As a result, their growth is stunted. This means that they couldn’t get enough nutrients from the soil for them to thrive. So, if you want your succulents to grow healthy and bloom, repot them when necessary. 

Let’s You Check Their Health

Aside from these, repotting also allows you to check your plant’s root system to see if they’re growing healthily. Decayed or damaged roots have to be snipped off to make sure that the roots grow better. As you check the roots, you can also trim off its dead leaves. 

When the succulent plant potting mix is not right for it, it can hinder the plant’s growth. When you see your succulent’s growth being stunted, maybe it needs repotting. When you decide to repot, make sure that the new pot can ensure proper water drainage. Water build-up in succulents can cause it to decay and allow fungal growth. 

While you repot, you can also check your plant for hiding insect pests. These creatures can cause significant damage to your plant when left unchecked for a long time. So, to avoid diseases and infestations might as well repot as soon as you can. 

Allows the Plant to Thrive

In essence, repottings allows you to improve the physical environment and overall health of your plant. It allows them to thrive and bloom, adding more beauty and providing more benefits to your room or personal space. The good thing is as they flourish, the advantages you reap from them also multiply by leaps and bounds. 

How Does Repotting Succulents Work

Knowing how to pot is an essential skill for any succulent owner. If you want your plants to grow healthy, stay healthy, and flourish in whichever environment you put them in, you need to know how to repot them. The main goal of repotting is to allow sufficient root drainage, aeration, and absorption of nutrients and minerals. All these help the succulent to grow healthily. 

Although it’s essential and customary to repot once every two or three years, the exact conditions that warrant repotting depend on the plant itself. So, what conditions call for repotting and why is it necessary to do so during these times? 

Provides Good Drainage 

Firstly, you need to repot newly bought succulents because usually, they only come in black plastic grow bags. These bags are not enough to hold the roots and the plant when it gets top-heavy. Aside from that, it also doesn’t always have good water-draining and aeration features, so it’s not good for your succulents. You need to repot in this case to improve the environment of your plant. Repotting may add stress experienced by the plant as it was transported from the store to your home. This is exactly the reason why it’s best to continue the stress the plant is feeling to let it adapt. It might be detrimental to its health if you subject it to stress again later. 

Gives More Space for the Roots 

Secondly, when the succulent is root-bounded and overcrowding, you need to repot it as well. After a year, you might see your healthy succulents, especially mat-forming varieties like Crassula and Sedum, to overgrow their respective pots. If you don’t repot despite reaching this condition, you’ll see that its supposedly appealing bushy and thick growth could result in the plant using up all of the space and nutrients from the pot. 

How Does Repotting Succulents Work

Though not every succulent variety develops a complex and obtrusive root system, they will still grow fuller, with the possibility of root-binding the plant. In this case, the root will occupy most of the space left in the pot, restricting its growth. Repotting is essential in this case to provide the succulent with ample legroom to grow and take advantage of the nutrients from the repotted soil. This will also allow you to make new plants and propagate from their overgrowths. 

Prevents Compacting of the Soil 

Another reason for repotting is poor drainage and compacted soil. In these two instances, the water clumps the soil together and as time passes by, it causes more damage to the plant. To lessen the soil’s compactness and increase the percolation rate, you need to repot your succulent. Most of the time, the water only stays on the topsoil, depriving the root of sufficient water. This can dehydrate the plant and rot its stem. The only way to alleviate its condition is to aerate your soil or change it completely.

Some planters only have tiny holes as drainage. These tiny holes can get clogged very easily, letting the pebbles and soil debris mix with the soil. In that case, the soil gets too saturated, leading to rotting of the roots. To keep this from happening, you need to repot your plants. 

Revives an Unhealthy-Looking Plant 

There would be times that your plant might look down and sad, possibly showing symptoms like a leaf falling, wilting, and yellowing. Since you’re not sure what its real problem is, it’s better to repot and see if diseases and pests are attacking it. It’s also good to repot during this time to check if there are soil and root issues. A simple repotting will change the soil and clean the plant’s immediate surroundings, instantly giving it a boost. 

Replaces Damaged Pots 

The most obvious and simple reason why you need to repot is to change an already damaged pot. You see, the pot also adds charm and aesthetics to your plant, especially the decorative varieties. If the plant root or any mechanical problem caused the damage to the pot, immediate repotting needs to be performed. Through this simple act, the roots and soil can be saved from falling apart while also setting the whole plant to be more aesthetically appealing. 

How Do You Know Your Succulents Need Repotting

Succulents come in a plethora of colors and shapes. These wonderful evergreens always bring joy and pleasure to their owner. They are also easy to grow and maintain as they make excellent decors and houseplants. And since they’re not hard to raise, even those who lack a green thumb can grow them seamlessly. However, this doesn’t mean that you can simply forget about them after you plant them. There are specific circumstances when you need to check if they’re still thriving in their environment. 

Generally, these plants are slow-growing and only rarely necessitate repotting. Then again, some cases make repotting necessary. 

Knowing when it’s time to repot your plants is essential in keeping their health and long life. Here are the instances that call for repotting. 

Roots Are Growing Through the Bottom of the Pot

One of the indications that you need to repot your succulent is if you see that they’re already root-bound. This only means that the current pot they’re in is already too small for them to thrive. Unless you want your poor succulent to suffer from stunted growth, you have to get a bigger pot. The roots can intervene and clog the drainage holes as they become more tightly packed. 

The key to keeping your succulent growing successfully is to choose an appropriately-sized container. If you choose an extremely small one, your succulent will spread rapidly, causing it to become root-bound in no time. Go for larger containers since it offers more room for your plants to spread and grow as much as they can. If the roots can spread widely and healthily, the plants’ growth will likewise be boosted. 

Soil Dries Out Too Fast

How Do You Know Your Succulents Need Repotting

When you notice that after watering your plant, the soil dries too fast, that means that your plant’s growth medium is no longer serving it as expected. This further means that it’s time for you to shift to new pots. Your succulents might like to thrive in a well-draining mix, but you also need to ensure that the soil will stay moist enough for the roots to absorb some of the moisture. 

In this case, the best answer is to give your plant a new beginning by changing its potting mix. Stay away from poor potting medium and stick with the ideal 1:1 perlite to soil ratio to ensure the succulent’s better growth. 

Succulents Are Too Heavy

When you see your succulents growing tall and top-heavy, that’s an indication that it’s not getting enough sunlight. This calls for branch pruning, rerooting, and shortening of its stems. And while you’re at it, you might as well give your succulent a new home by repotting it. It’s like giving it a fresh start. This time, make sure that you give it ample sunlight and more legroom for its roots to expand and grow. 

Succulent Looks Unhealthy

There are plenty of reasons to explain why a succulent looks unhealthy. One of these is maybe it’s not getting enough water or is being overwatered. It could also be because it has outgrown its pot and has already exhausted its soil nutrients. Another reason for its unhealthy look could also be that pests and insects are pestering its leaves and stem. To get rid of all these problems altogether, it’s best to repot. Prune infected leaves and stems, and choose a larger pot with better water-draining and aeration capacities. This small change can significantly impact the overall health and look of your succulent plant. 

Tools Needed to Repot Succulents

When you’re replanting or transferring your succulents, it’s best to only use proper planting tools. These tools could get the work done with ease and without causing damage to the plant and its environment. So, before you decide to take on any succulent-repotting task, make sure that the following tools are within reach. 

Pot

The pot is not only a functional tool but also one for aesthetics. When you need to repot, it’s basic that you should have the right pot for your succulent. As you already know, it’s almost always better to get a larger pot for your succulent to freely grow and spread its roots without clogging the pot’s drainage.

It’s also essential that you use a pot that has a substantial hole-size to keep water from sitting on the soil, causing irreversible damage to your plant. Aside from these pot characteristics, it would also offer more advantages if you use a pot that’s sturdy to hold its weight yet lightweight enough for rotating and moving. 

There are different materials used to make pots and you can find them made from concrete, ceramic, plastic, and terracotta. You can use any of these pots, but just make sure that what you choose can dissipate heat, retain water, and withstand growth and movement. 

Soil

Soil is also essential when repotting, but you can’t just any kind of soil for your succulents. Your potting mix has to contain 70 to 80% of the mineral and at least 20% of the organic material. Aside from that, it also needs to be gritty enough to mimic the plant’s natural growing media while also being porous enough to moisten and hold its soil. 

The soil’s mineral materials must include any of the following — volcanic rock, fine gravel, and coarse sand. On the other hand, the organic materials include a mixture of soil and compost, pine bark, or coconut coir. It will also do the plant good if you include slow-release fertilizer into the mixture to also supply plants with vital nutrients. 

Tools Needed to Repot Succulents

Trowel

When you repot, you’ll go through clumping, hard-packed soil and webbed roots. To help you break and cut them up, you’ll need a serrated-edge hand trowel. Keeping this tool within reach as you repot your succulents can make the whole process easy and seamless. 

Coffee Filters

Coffee filters are essential when making up your dirt mixture. Remember that when you choose a potting soil, go for the basic one since succulents hate soil that’s additive-rich. The goal of mixing the soil is to promptly  get as many nutrients, light, food, and water to the rooty. And to keep your soil mixture inside the pot, lay down your coffee filter at the bottom. This is thin enough to hold the soil and also allow excess water to drain. 

Things to Consider Before Repotting Succulents

By now, you already know why you need to repot and the necessary tools to execute it effectively. This time, let’s learn what are the things to look for before you proceed to the actual repotting task. 

Too Dusty

If you’re into gritty materials like lava rock and you see that they’re covered in dust, know that the dust can clog your soil. To remedy the problem, consider rinsing it before you start repotting. Pour your desired amount into the container that’s twice its size. After that, add water into your container. Once the water is poured, you’ll see how much dust has accumulated. Pour the water anywhere except your drain. Keep filling your container and pouring the water out until it becomes clear. Ideally, it might take you at least six tries before you’re ready to mix in. 

Large Drainage Hole

Extra-large drainage holes will only force your soil to slip through its holes. The easy fix for this issue is to use a mesh tape or window screen over the hole. The former can help the soil stay in place, while the latter can secure the soil’s pressure. You can find these two in any hardware store. 

No Drainage Hole

As mentioned above, you’ll need mesh tape and a window screen to help secure the soil’s pressure and keep it stay in place. If the drainage hole isn’t present, you need to replace your pot and use one that has adequately-sized holes to allow water to drain and keep the succulent from getting soaked and moldy. 

Too Deep Pot

This is a problem that can be fixed easily. If your pot of choice is too deep, you might as well fill it with substrate up to the level that you would like to start filling with soil. Make sure to set up a weed barrier or window screen layer to keep the substrate from meshing with the drainage layer. The goal here is to make the screen as flat as necessary to make covering possible. After this, add soil on top of it, press against the screen, and enter the drainage layer. This will minimize the mixture of soil with it. 

Compacted Roots

Though this isn’t much of an issue for succulents, if ever you see roots that are densely packed as you pull your plant out, loosen them slowly to allow them to grow into the new soil. Simply rub them gently as you also massage them out. 

Things to Consider Before Repotting Succulents

How to Repot Succulents

Now that you have taken care of the prerequisites before repotting, it’s time to learn how to repot properly. If it’s your first time doing it, the task can seem to be intimidating and overwhelming at the same time. But don’t let that get to you. Give it a try and once you get the hang of it, it’s even easier and more enjoyable than you deem it. 

Step 1 – Prepare the substrate

Let’s start working on your new pot by adding an ample amount of substrate to the pot’s bottom part. Succulent seeds do well in a sand-rich potting substrate. Ensure that it’s enough to elevate the succulent’s height within the new soil level or slightly above it. Remember never to mound over their stems just like tomatoes. It’s also perfectly normal for your plant to look like they only need a small amount of soil since they have shallow roots and the pots are just considered as small upgrades. 

Step 2 – Plant your succulent

As soon as the pot’s bottom part is layered, it’s time to plant the succulent and fill it with soil. If the plant you’re planting is a bunch and they wouldn’t stay in place, use your hand to nudge them into its exact position. Fill the extra space with more soil to keep your plant stabler in an erect position. As you place the plant in, add more soil around it. This could also keep them in place. If you intend to place your plant outdoors and near the ground, make sure to leave more space between the soil and the pot’s upper surface to keep the soil from spilling and draining off. 

Step 3 – Finalize the topmost layer

If you want to add desert moss or pebbles at the topmost layer, go on. Just make sure that you don’t overdo it and give ample space for the air to circulate. Never allow your plant to drench in water as it might drown your succulent and cause it to die. You’re now officially ready to show off your newly-repotted plant. 

 

How to Repot Succulent Leaves

Repot succulents from leaves with these easy steps. 

Step 1 – Choose the leaf to repot  

From the leaves that fall of your succulent, choose one for repotting. If there’s none, gently remove one from the plant itself. 

Step 2 – Dry out the leaf’s end

The moment you have chosen a leaf, place it on top of a clean paper and allow its end to dry out before repotting. You can also use your coffee filter to let the leaf dry out. 

Step 3 – Transfer the leaf to the pot 

Once the leaf end has fully dried, take out your pot and fill it up according to this order —  coffee filter as a base, substrate, screen for the substrate, and finally, the soil. On top of the soil, carefully lay the cut leaf.

Step 4 – Give in filtered sunlight

Never expose your growing leaf to direct sunlight. Instead, position them next to blinds or curtains and allow a small amount of sunlight to hit them. Also, make sure to gently mist it with water using a sprayer. 

Step 5 – Remove the original leaf

If you see your succulent grow at least half an inch, carefully remove the original leaf and allow the newly grown plant to grow and thrive. 

 

How to Repot Succulent Cuttings

The next step is to learn how to repot succulents through stem cuttings. Here’s how. 

Step 1 – Choose the stem cutting to repot

With the use of a pair of sharp scissors, carefully choose the stem of the succulent plant that you’re going to use. Cut it gently. 

Step 2 – Dry out the stem

The moment you have chosen a stem cutting, place it on top of a clean paper and allow its end to dry out before repotting. You can also use your coffee filter to let the leaf dry out. 

Step 3 – Remove the leaves 

After drying out the stem, gently remove the leaves that grow on the sides of the stem. 

Step 4 – Plant the stem

Once the stem has fully dried and once you’ve taken out the leaves on all sides of the stem, take out your pot and fill it up according to this order — coffee filter as a base, substrate, screen for the substrate, and finally, the soil. On top of the soil, carefully lay the cut leaf. Water it a couple of times per week. 

Step 5 – Watch it grow

Sit back and enjoy watching your new succulent grow. Watch out for the baby plant to grow out of the stem. 

 

How to Repot Succulents in Glass 

If you’re in the mood for some artsy stuff, you can take a more challenging repotting task by repotting succulents in glasses. Here are simple steps you can follow. 

Step 1 – Gather your tools 

It’s best to prepare your tools ahead of time to make the whole process seamless. For this task, you’ll need the following tools: 

  • Bucket 
  • Dish soap 
  • Garden trowel
  • Moss 
  • Pebbles 
  • Potting soil 
  • Sandpaper
  • Scissors
  • Scrubber
  • Stainless steel brush 
  • Succulents 
  • Twine
  • Yogurt jars

Step 2 – Clean your jars 

Since you’ll be using a glass to repot your succulents, it’s important to make sure that these jars are clean. To ensure that they’re thoroughly clean, soak them in hot, soapy liquid. Ensure that the labels won’t clog the drain and use a bucket when you clean them. Scrub off residual adhesive off the rims and sides of the yogurt jars. Rinse them completely. 

Step 3 – Cover the base with potting soil

Once the jar is dry and clean, fill the base of the jar with potting soil. Once the base is properly laid, put your succulents inside the jar. Fill the space with more potting soil to make sure that your plant doesn’t wiggle. Tap your glass jar with a toothpick to efficiently spread the water and soil—only water your plant when you see that your soil is dry. 

Step 4 – Add moss or pebbles

For a more polished look, add some moss or pebbles on top and around the plant. Be creative!

 

How to Repot Succulent Arrangement 

Repotting succulent arrangement is almost the same as repotting succulents, except you add ornaments and other types or classes of succulent. 

Step 1 – Prepare the substrate

Let’s start working on your new pot by adding an ample amount of substrate to the pot’s bottom part. Ensure that it’s enough to elevate the succulent’s height within the new soil level or slightly above it. Remember never to mound over their stems just like tomatoes. It’s also perfectly normal for your plant to look like they only need a small amount of soil since they have shallow roots and the pots are just considered as small upgrades. 

Step 2 – Plant your succulent

As soon as the pot’s bottom part is layered, it’s time to plant the succulent and fill it with soil. If the plant you’re planting is a bunch and they wouldn’t stay in place, use your hand to nudge them into its exact position. Add as many succulent as you like. Also, make sure that they’re positioned accordingly before you fill the spaces with potting mix. 

Fill the extra space with more soil to keep your plant stabler in an erect position. As you place the plant in, add more soil around it. This could also keep them in place. If you intend to place your plant outdoors and near the ground, make sure to leave more space between the soil and the pot’s upper surface to keep the soil from spilling and draining off. 

Step 3 – Finalize the topmost layer

In succulent arrangements, the topmost layer is the highlight since it upgrades the look of the arrangement. So, make sure to put in effort in beautifying it. 

If you want to add desert moss or pebbles at the topmost layer, go on. Just make sure that you don’t overdo it and give ample space for the air to circulate. Never allow your plant to drench in water as it might drown your succulent and cause it to die. You’re now officially ready to show off your newly-repotted plant. 

 

How to Repot Succulents With Rocks 

You can also repot your succulents with the use of rocks. Here’s how. 

Step 1 – Gather your materials and make sure they’re within reach

For this project, you’ll need the following — sand, soil, small rocks, pot or container, and different kinds of succulents. 

Step 2 – Position the rocks at the bottom

Put out your pot and add the rocks at the bottom of the rock to serve as a base. Make sure that there’s enough space for water to drain.

Step 3 – Add soil

Once the base is properly laid out, add the moistened porous soil on top of the small rocks. This will help moisten the succulent when they start to dry out. 

Step 4 – Plant the succulents. 

Loosen the succulents’ roots and soil and position the largest succulent on one side of the pot. Work your way to the other end of the planter by planting succulents according to sizes. The smallest should be on the opposite end of the largest plant. 

Step 5 – Stabilize the plants

To keep the succulents from wiggling, add more potting mix or soil around each plant. Decorate it with aquarium rocks for variety in color and added aesthetics. 

How to Repot Succulents With Sand 

Repotting succulents with sand is almost similar to repotting them with the use of rocks. Here’s a simple guide to help you clear this task. 

Step 1 – Gather your materials and make sure they’re within reach

For this project, you’ll need the following — an assortment of colored sand, cactus soil, 1 big glass container, 1 smaller glass container, stiff piece of paper, small decorative rocks, a big syringe, and different kinds of succulents. 

Step 2 – Position the rocks at the bottom

Put out your small glass container and add cactus soil at the bottom to serve as the base. Loosen the succulents’ roots and soil and position the largest succulent on one side of the pot. Work your way to the other end of the planter by planting succulents according to sizes. The smallest should be on the opposite end of the largest plant. Plot your succulent according to your design or arrangement in mind. Water the arrangement. 

Step 3 – Stabilize the plants

To keep the succulents from wiggling, add more potting mix or soil around each plant. Decorate it with aquarium rocks for variety in color and added aesthetics. 

Step 4 – Put the small glass inside the larger one

Once you’re done arranging and planting your succulents inside the smaller jar, place them at the center of the bigger jar. To keep the sand from touching the smaller jar with the succulents, use a stiff piece of paper to guide the sand. For variety and color, you can use colored sand. Alternate the colors of the sand per layer.

Step 5 – Finalize the topmost layer

In succulent arrangements, the topmost layer is the highlight since it upgrades the look of the arrangement. So, make sure to put in effort in beautifying it. 

If you want to add desert moss or pebbles at the topmost layer, go on. Just make sure that you don’t overdo it and give ample space for the air to circulate. Never allow your plant to drench in water as it might drown your succulent and cause it to die. You’re now officially ready to show off your newly-repotted plant. 

Mistakes to Avoid When Repotting Succulents

Mistakes to Avoid When Repotting Succulents

Since you already know virtually every single of repotting succulents, let’s seal that knowledge by knowing and preventing these common pitfalls. 

Wrong Size of the Container

By now, you already know the importance of using the right container size for your succulents. No matter how small your plant starts, since they’re alive, they are bound to grow. Their growth is seen in the expansion of its roots, growing of the stems, and blooming of the plant. 

If you keep them in a small container, it’s almost the same as stunting their growth. Since the roots could no longer spread out, it might also clog your drainage. And since the soil’s nutrients are exhausted, they would also stop growing. All these conditions can adversely affect the growth and well-being of your succulent. 

Incorrect Soil

The succulent gets its nourishment from the soil, so if you use the wrong kind of soil, they’ll end up undernourished and unhealthy. Also, the right of the soil allows water to drain out properly. Since succulents are sensitive to water, underwatering and overwatering can cause chaos and send them into a plant coma. So, before you repot them, make sure that you’re only using the proper kind of soil. When in doubt, use cactus soil or potting mix. That should solve your dilemma. 

Overwatering

Overwatering of your plant can cause it to be soggy and moldy. You know that you have overwatered your succulent when you see its leaves turn mushy, squishy, and extra soft. You’ll also see the same leaves have a more translucent color than any ordinary, healthy plant. Soon after, you’ll see the leaves fall from the plant even when not touched. You can water them daily, but only leave the soil damp instead of soaking wet. This will ensure that the roots have access to enough water. 

Bad Timing

Though it’s advisable to repot your succulents once every 12 to 18 months, there are varieties that can go on unrepotted for a couple of years. Know how long your succulents need to stay in the same planter before they need repotting because bad timing can lead to plant stress. When this happens, your succulent’s health might suffer. 

Unrealistic Expectations

Even if your succulents are low-maintenance plants, it’s wrong to assume that even if you leave them inside the drawer for weeks, they’ll be in tip-top shape. These are living plants, so they need sunlight, air, water, and care to thrive. Know what is required from a supposed owner before deciding to own a succulent. 

Do’s and Don’ts When Repotting Succulents

Here are some of the common do’s and don’ts when it comes to repotting succulents: 

Do’s

  • Do choose a larger-sized planter or pot when repotting. 
  • Do ensure that your pot has sufficient soil for water drainage. 
  • Do go for the world’s best flowering succulents.
  • Do be patient. If you don’t have time and patience to take care of your succulents, decide on choosing artificial succulents instead of real ones
  • Do invest in gardening tools when you start growing succulents and plants. 
  • Do know how to take care of your newly-repotted succulents. 
  • Do make sure that they’re placed in an indoor area with sufficient sunlight and great ventilation. 
  • Do make balanced succulent soil at home.
  • Do repot your succulents immediately after buying them. 
  • Do treat your succulents though they’re your pets. 
  • Do understand the needs and nature of the succulent variety you decide to grow.
  • Do use the right soil when repotting. 

Don’ts

  • Don’t forget about watering your succulents. 
  • Don’t overwater your succulents until they wilt. 
  • Don’t forget to repot your succulents after buying them. 
  • Don’t allow the plant to stay longer in nursery bags or small-size planters. 
  • Don’t plant your succulent directly in the sand. 
  • Don’t choose planters and pots that don’t have drainage. 
  • Don’t forget to take note of how frequently your succulent needs repotting. 

FAQ About Repotting Succulents

Here are some of the answers to the most commonly asked questions about succulents.

How do I know when to repot my succulents?

As mentioned above, numerous tell-tale signs would let you know that it’s high time to repot and they are the following. 

  • Roots are growing through the bottom of the pot
  • Soil dries out too fast
  • Succulents are too heavy
  • Succulent looks unhealthy

Refer to the more in-depth discussions of these signs above. 

Do you need special potting soil for succulents?

FAQ About Repotting Succulents

As you already know, succulents need a special kind of soil with water-draining capacity. This means ordinary potting mix or the regular soil in your garden doesn’t qualify. When planting succulents for the first time or repotting them for the nth time, only use cactus soil. If this isn’t possible, mix your potting soil with perlite, pumice, or sand. Since succulent roots are quite sensitive, take extra precaution when repotting them. Take note that the cactus plant stores moisture in its roots. 

How often should you repot succulents?

Though it’s advisable to repot your succulents once every 12 to 18 months, there are varieties that can go on unrepotted for a couple of years. Know how long your succulents need to stay in the same planter before they need repotting because bad timing can lead to plant stress. When this happens, your succulent’s health might suffer. 

Do succulents like to be crowded?

You can plant your succulents in a crowded arrangement, but you can’t expect them to grow fast and nicely. To make sure that they thrive, grow them in wide areas that allow their roots to spread. 

What is the best potting mix for succulents?

If you want the best mix for your succulents, you can start with a succulent and cactus soil mixture. Aside from this, you can also try the African violet mix as potting soil. You can add extra ingredients that can improve the pot drainage, hold up longer without compacting, and make watering easier.

Do you water succulents after repotting?

Though it’s okay to water your succulent after repotting, experts suggest waiting at least a week after repotting before you water your plant. When you do, never soak your plant. Just make sure that the soil is damp and your plant will be fine. Also, experts suggest to water succulents with the soak and dry method. This is more helpful than regular watering. 

Should you remove old soil when repotting?

Yes, it’s best to remove old soil when repotting, most especially if your plant has been suffering from a disease. Retaining the old soil is like keeping the probable cause of your succulent’s disease. So, instead of simply adding a new mixed potting mix, change all the soil inside the pot. This will give your plant a fresh start. 

Conclusion

Repotting succulents may seem to be overwhelming and tedious at first. However, if you practice doing it often, you’ll get the hang of it in no time. Just remember that growing a plant is also a kind of commitment. By taking them under your care, you assume the role of their owner that’s bound to look after them and ensure their welfare. 

When it comes to succulent, you don’t have to be overbearing since it’s generally a low-maintenance plant. Then again, even if it doesn’t require much effort to raise, it doesn’t mean that you can just let it grow by itself. The plant isn’t capable of watering, aerating, and exposing itself to sunlight. It relies on you as its owner to do these things for them. So, be a responsible, succulent owner and study the basics before you decide to bring home one. 

Photos from: Sonyachny / depositphotos.com, Dekol / depositphotos.com, Gicku91 / depositphotos.com, sablinstanislav / depositphotos.com, serezniy / depositphotos.com and Irishasel / depositphotos.com.